Archive | Health Care Bill Impact on Business

Most Small Businesses Not Planning for Health Care Reform According to Survey

Survey of true “small businesses” explores how employers feel about health care reform, why they provide coverage, and how far they’re willing to go to save money

Mountain View, CA – March 21, 2012 – The majority (85%) of small businesses are not making changes or long-term plans based on health care reform legislation, according to a recent survey of small business owners released today by eHealth, Inc.

Beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) requires businesses with the equivalent of fifty or more full-time employees to provide health insurance coverage for their workers. However, businesses with fewer than 50 employees are exempt from this requirement, although employees may be required to purchase their own coverage.

eHealth’s Small Employer Health Insurance Survey focuses on these small businesses, many of them family-run. Nearly nine-in-ten (88%) of the small businesses responding to the survey had ten employees or fewer. The survey was conducted anonymously online between February 10 and March 13, 2012 and gathered responses from a total of 236 small businesses that had purchased group health insurance policies through eHealthInsurance.com.

Based on their size (fewer than 50 employees) none of the businesses surveyed would be required by the ACA to offer health insurance coverage to employees in 2014. However, the majority (60%) planned to continue offering coverage for their employees in 2014. Among those employers who considered themselves knowledgeable about aspects of the ACA, a larger majority (69%) said they had no plans to stop offering coverage to employees. According to the survey, most employers feel they have a moral obligation to provide health insurance for employees or feel they need to continue to do so in order to recruit and retain talented workers.

Small businesses are still sensitive to health care costs, however, with nearly all respondents (95%) citing “affordability” as one of the two most important factors when choosing a plan. Small businesses are also open to creative solutions to reduce health coverage costs. Many are willing to drop benefits like dental and vision (58%) or consider raising deductibles and offering accident or critical illness coverage (74%) in order to keep costs lower and continue offering employees health insurance.
eHealth’s Small Employer Health Insurance Survey report can be downloaded in full here or through the eHealth, Inc. Media Center.

Additional Survey Results

  • Nearly eight-in-ten small businesses (79%) report spending $200 or more for health insurance per insured employees or dependent each month
  • A majority (53%) said they required employees to contribute 10% or less of the total cost for their own or their dependents’ monthly health insurance premiums
  • More than six-in-ten (61%) reported that enrollee deductibles on their group health insurance plans were $1,500 or less per year
  • One-third of respondents (34%) said they might consider dropping employer-based group health insurance beginning in 2014
  • A majority of respondents (53%) said that they always or sometimes impose waiting periods before allowing new employees to join the company health insurance plan
  • More than four-in-ten (44%) said they felt a “moral obligation” to provide employees with health insurance
  • Most small businesses identified “affordability” (95%) and “richness of benefits” (68%) as the two most important factors when choosing a health insurance plan
  • Only six percent considered the insurer’s brand a top-two factor when choosing a plan
0

Two Years Later—The ObamaCare Lies Continue

THIS ARTICLE IS AN EDITORIAL FROM INVESTORS BUSINESS DAILY

The Obama Record: Little noticed in the president’s remarks attacking the Supreme Court last week were two whoppers he told about ObamaCare. Then again, since that reform was built on untruths, why should he stop now?

At that press event, Obama told any justice thinking of overturning ObamaCare’s central tenet that “in the absence of an individual mandate, you cannot have a mechanism to ensure that people with pre-existing conditions can actually get health care.”

But this is false.

In fact, Obama himself argued precisely the opposite during the 2008 campaign, saying a mandate wasn’t needed to achieve universal coverage. “The reason people don’t have health insurance isn’t because they don’t want it,” he said then. “It’s because they can’t afford it.”

Plus, ObamaCare itself proves a mandate isn’t needed to cover those with pre-existing conditions. The law set up federal “high risk” pools that offer insurance to those denied it by private companies. Yet instead of making this a permanent solution, Obama kills these pools off in 2014 in favor of the mandate.

Obama also claimed at that press conference that the law “was passed by a strong majority of a democratically elected Congress.”

Also false.

The House approved it by a slim 7-vote margin, with 34 Democrats joining every Republican to oppose it. Less than a year later, the House voted to repeal ObamaCare by a significantly larger margin, 245-189.

It was only in the Senate, where Democrats held a temporary supermajority, that it did well, and even then they could only get it through using a variety of unusual parliamentary tricks. What’s more, just 51 Senators voted to keep the law in a 2011 vote.

But as the old saying goes, lies beget more lies. Here’s just a sampling of past Obama prevarications about his signature reform law:

“If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period. If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan, period. No one will take it away, no matter what.”

Fact: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that as many as 20 million will be forced off their plans as employers dump workers into the government health exchanges to avoid ObamaCare’s costs. A survey by McKinsey and Co. found that nearly a third of employers were likely to drop coverage for employees once ObamaCare kicked in.

And an analysis by the Medicare actuary found that ObamaCare’s attacks on Medicare’s private insurance options would force nearly 8 million seniors out of plans they’ve chosen.

“If any bill arrives from Congress that is not controlling costs, that’s not a bill I can support.  It’s going to have to control costs.”

Fact: The law Obama signed contains no meaningful cost-control provisions, something every honest health care analyst admits.

“We will bring down premiums by $2,500 for the typical family.”

Fact: The CBO projects that premiums over the next decade will climb at a faster rate than they did in the past five years. The CBO also projects that premiums in the individual insurance market will be as much as 13% higher in 2016 as a result of the law. Premiums for small businesses could go up 1%. Meanwhile, a study done for Wisconsin by one of the architects of ObamaCare found that “the majority of individuals in the nongroup market will pay more in premiums for health insurance in 2016 than they do today.” The average increase: 30%.

“And it will slow the growth of health care costs for our families, our businesses, and our government.”

Fact: ObamaCare will accelerate spending at every level. In 2014, when the law takes full effect, national spending on health care will shoot up 8% and go on climbing at more than 6% a year, according to official government forecasts.

“The plan I’m proposing will cost around $900 billion over 10 years.”

Fact: The current Congressional Budget Office report pegs the 10-year cost of ObamaCare at $1.7 trillion. The only way Obama could get his price tag down so low is by putting off the start date by four years. Once Obama-Care fully kicks in, it will add $260 billion a year, and rising, to the budget.

“To help ensure that everyone can afford the cost of a health care option in our exchange, we need to provide assistance to families who need it. That way, there will be no reason at all for anyone to remain uninsured.”

Fact: Despite spending $800 billion to subsidize premiums in the government-run exchanges, over the next 10 years, along with $931 billion in new Medicaid costs, ObamaCare will still leave 27 million — or 10% of the population — uninsured, according to the CBO.

We could go on, but you get the idea.

The best thing the Supreme Court could do for the country is to chuck the entire law, and give Congress the opportunity to put together an honest package of reforms.

Emphasis added

0

Officials ponder how to ensure healthcare reform in California

As doubts grow about the survival of the federal healthcare law, state officials are considering ways to keep key elements of the legislation alive in California.

Skepticism of the Affordable Care Act by conservative Supreme Court justices during oral arguments last week has raised the possibility the court will strike the individual mandate to purchase health coverage or throw out the entire law as unconstitutional.

Even if the whole law is scrapped nationally, many of its consumer protections, such as guaranteed coverage for children, are expected to survive in California. But a massive expansion of coverage for the poor and the uninsured would be doubtful without tens of billions of dollars in federal aid.

There’s already legislation pending in Sacramento to further implement the federal overhaul, and those proposals could become the vehicle for a state substitute. Crucial to that effort, supporters say, would be ensuring all Californians purchase health coverage in order to spread the risk and lower costs for everyone.

“I would work with other state leaders to make sure California continues to move ahead,” said Dave Jones, state insurance commissioner. “We require everyone to have auto insurance in California, and the world hasn’t stopped spinning on its axis. All this political tumult generated by the far right is really ignoring the reality in California and elsewhere.”

Assemblyman William Monning (D-Carmel), who is chairman of the state Assembly Health Committee, said he would support a measure mandating Californians buy coverage if federal funding is still available to assist consumers.

But Monning said such a measure probably would take a two-thirds majority vote in the Assembly and Senate because such a state requirement to buy coverage could be considered a tax and require a super-majority. “It could be an uphill fight to get the political support to do that,” he said.

California went down this route before, nearly approving an individual mandate in 2008 as part of reform under then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Some health-policy experts said California could pursue other options to encourage healthy consumers to join the insurance pool and to help offset the medical costs of sicker policyholders. The state could impose an open enrollment period similar to what employers use and have penalties for people who try to sign up at a later time.

California insurers are preparing to fight any efforts to force them to accept sick applicants without some requirement that healthy Californians enter the market as well. Without that, the industry warns that premiums will rise substantially and even more people will drop coverage. The state has nearly 7 million uninsured, or about 21% of the population, according to the California HealthCare Foundation.

“California would need to look at the pillars upon which the entire Affordable Care Act is based and make sure there is not a problem that comes from pulling out one pillar of the structure,” said Patrick Johnston, president of the California Assn. of Health Plans.

Soon after President Obama signed the healthcare law in March 2010, California took the lead and became the first state to enact legislation for an insurance exchange, which is designed to negotiate the best rates with insurers and help millions of consumers shop for policies.

Since then, state lawmakers have passed other laws implementing federal reform, including provisions that guaranteed coverage for those under age 19, allowed young adults to remain on their parents’ policies until age 26 and mandated maternity coverage.

Jones said all those reforms — plus a new state requirement that health insurers spend at least 80% of premiums collected on medical care for individual policyholders — would remain intact without the federal law. Insurers contend that California’s rule on spending for medical care may not stand if the federal law is deemed unconstitutional.

But the biggest blow by far would come if the Supreme Court ruling cuts off federal money for the two most expensive parts of the federal healthcare program: an expansion of Medi-Cal — the state and federal program for the poor and disabled — and subsidies for families purchasing private coverage.

Under the federal law, California stands to get as much as $55 billion in federal funds for the Medi-Cal expansion from 2014 to 2019, according to the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, and a similar amount for subsidies for people who are now uninsured. An estimated 2 million people would be added to Medi-Cal, and 2.2 million Californians could be eligible for subsidies toward the purchase of private coverage.

Meanwhile, the California Health Benefit Exchange — using about $40 million in federal money — has been setting up an enrollment process and marketing campaign to reach consumers in preparation for a January 2014 launch.

Peter V. Lee, the exchange’s executive director and a former healthcare official in the Obama administration, said he’s aware state lawmakers are looking at a health insurance requirement for all Californians, but the exchange has not taken a position while the court’s decision is pending.

Lee said both a mandate and government subsidies are crucial components to ensure the exchange attracts a large enough pool of consumers to be effective.

“The exchange in California isn’t pausing, isn’t waiting, isn’t taking its foot off the gas,” Lee said. “There’s a broad consensus in this state that we need to address the access and affordability problem together.”

Consumer advocates are urging state leaders to forge ahead because, they say, the status quo is untenable for people with and without insurance. The average California family with coverage pays an additional $1,400 in premiums annually to cover the costs of the uninsured, according to the California Endowment, a private foundation focused on health issues.

“It is a little premature to be reading an obituary” for the federal law, Insurance Commissioner Jones said. “Having said that, we need to be prepared, and those conversations are occurring.”

Modified from an article by Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times

0

California seeks limits on small-business self-insurance trend

Critics say health insurers offering new type of self-insurance for firms with as few as 25 workers are gaming the system and may undermine a key goal of the federal Affordable Care Act.

Sensing a fresh threat to state and federal healthcare reforms, California insurance officials are seeking new limits on a controversial form of health coverage insurers are selling to small employers. At issue is a new type of self-insurance for small businesses with as few as 25 workers.

Self-insurance, in which employers pay medical providers for their workers’ care, has traditionally been used only by large employers that have the financial resources to pay for expensive medical claims. A Kaiser Family Foundation study found that 60% of U.S. workers with health coverage were in self-insured plans last year.

About 3 million Californians get health coverage through small businesses with fewer than 50 employees while 15 million are insured through larger employers, according to the California HealthCare Foundation. Small businesses are eager for new options since the average premium for employer coverage in California has increased 154% over the last decade, more than five times the 29% increase in the state’s overall inflation rate.

Critics said insurers such as Cigna Corp. are using these new plans to game the system and cherry-pick companies with healthier workers. They said this could undermine a key goal of the federal Affordable Care Act to lower premiums by pooling together more healthy and sick Americans into insurance exchanges. Premiums could continue to escalate without a diverse pool of consumers. That prospect has federal health officials weighing action against this practice as well.

*Self-insurance is attractive for many reasons, particularly the prospect of lower costs. It’s exempt from state insurance regulations such as mandated benefits, granting employers the flexibility to design their own benefit package and the opportunity to reap some of the savings from employee wellness programs. A federal law, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, governs self-funded plans. Some aspects of the Affordable Care Act do apply to self-insurance, such as the elimination of caps on lifetime benefits and some preventive care at no cost.

Insurance officials say that they are responding to employer demands for more affordable coverage and that regulators shouldn’t interfere in the market. Mike Ferguson, chief operating officer at the Self-Insurance Industry Institute of America, a trade group, said there’s no evidence that insurers are targeting companies with healthier employees.

“We are concerned about regulators’ actions because self-insurance is arguably one segment of the healthcare market that is working well,” Ferguson said. “These companies are generally able to control costs better and offer more customized benefits.”

Now some insurers are chasing after much smaller customers with new plans designed to limit employer payouts for big claims using what’s called stop-loss policies. This guarantees that businesses won’t be responsible for anything over a certain amount per employee, perhaps as low as $10,000 or $20,000, with the rest paid by an insurer. Regulators and health-policy experts say this arrangement undercuts the notion of self-insurance since employers aren’t bearing much of the risk, and it allows companies to circumvent some state insurance rules.

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones will unveil proposed legislation next week that would bar insurers from selling stop-loss policies below a certain amount. The specific dollar figure is still under consideration, but some experts recommend a minimum of $40,000 per worker. This proposal would make these new self-insured plans less attractive for small employers because they would be on the hook for more employee medical bills.

“The goal of the legislation is to help ensure the success of the small group market as significant healthcare reforms are going into effect,” said Janice Rocco, California’s deputy insurance commissioner for health policy. “There’s a concern carriers are selling a product that’s not really appropriate for small groups.”

Officials in the Obama administration are keeping a close eye on developments in California and other states where insurers are aggressively selling these plans.

“We are working carefully to ensure that consumers in all markets have the protections guaranteed by the Affordable Care Act and will provide more clarity on the tools available to reinforce these protections soon,” a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said.

Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court will begin hearing arguments over the constitutionality of the federal healthcare law and specifically its mandate that individuals purchase health insurance.

Anthem Blue Cross, California’s largest for-profit insurer and a unit of WellPoint Inc., began selling these self-insured plans to employers with as few as 35 workers March 1, down from its previous minimum of 250 employees. Assurant Inc., a New York-based insurer, is selling plans to companies in California and other states with as few as 10 workers.

Marc Neely, vice president for Cigna’s self-insured business in 14 Western states, said his sales to small businesses with as few as 25 people are growing at a double-digit rate because employers are fed up with annual rate hikes of 10% to 15% on their traditional plans. Neely said Cigna offers stop-loss coverage as low as $20,000 per employee. “We’re excited about California as a growth market for us,” Neely said.

Higher stop-loss amounts are more the norm. The average stop-loss policy for firms with fewer than 200 workers was $78,321 per employee last year, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Larger firms had stop-loss coverage of $208,280 per worker, on average.

Some other states have already taken action. Oregon and New York ban the sale of stop-loss insurance to employers with fewer than 50 people enrolled, making self-insurance unappealing. However, there is debate over states’ power in this area because the federal ERISA law generally bars state regulation of self-insured plans.

This issue has even split the insurance industry. For instance, Blue Shield of California supports the state’s bid for tougher rules. But that hasn’t stopped the company from following its rivals by introducing self-insured plans in December for companies with as few as 100 employees. Previously, the company wouldn’t go below 250 workers.

“It has the potential to take out the favorable risks and destabilize the fully insured market,” said David Joyner, Blue Shield’s senior vice president of large group and specialty benefits. “There is a risk of cherry-picking.”

Joyner said it’s “silly” for insurers to provide stop-loss coverage as low as $10,000 to $20,000 since that’s not how self-insurance typically works. But Blue Shield isn’t willing to completely cede the market to its rivals. “We definitely need to offer something because our competitors are,” Joyner said.

Self-insured plans have an immediate cost advantage since there’s no state tax on insurance premiums being passed along by an insurer. Starting in 2014, they will also avoid additional fees levied on health insurers to help pay for the federal healthcare law. The Self-Insurance Institute of America estimates companies can save 3% to 5% annually because of better claims management.

Small businesses switching to self-insurance do gain more insight into why their medical costs might be rising so fast because they have access to detailed claims data. (Employee information is protected under federal privacy law.) Under California law, insurers aren’t required to share those details with an employer on a traditional health plan. Cigna’s Neely said companies like the ability to see whether their employees’ use of healthcare is above average and to make changes in the benefit package to bring those costs in line.

 

Modified from a Los Angeles Times article

0

Health care reform: Four inconvenient truths

President Barack Obama promised over and over during the health care debate that “if you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan.”

It turns out that, for a lot of people, that isn’t true.

A Congressional Budget Office report issued this week says that 3 million to 5 million people could move from employer-based health care plans to government-based programs as the Affordable Care Act takes effect. And in the worst-case scenario, it could be as many as 20 million.

For Obama, it’s an inconvenient truth at a really inconvenient time — coming less than two weeks before the Supreme Court begins oral arguments on the law and just as the administration touts the law’s early benefits on its second anniversary.

And it’s not the only hard truth Obama and the law’s supporters are facing. No matter what they said about rising health care costs, those costs aren’t actually going to go down under health care reform. The talk about the law paying for itself is just educated guesswork. And people aren’t actually liking the law more as they learn more about it — and some polls show they are just getting more confused.

But it’s Obama’s signature promise — “If you like it, you can keep it” — that’s most likely to get thrown back in his face. Here are the four hard truths of health care reform as the law approaches its March 23 anniversary:

1) Some people won’t get to keep the coverage they like.

For Republicans, the CBO report is a giant “I told you so” moment — and they’re lining up to tell you so.

“President Obama repeatedly promised during the health care debate, ‘if you like your current plan, you will be able to keep it,’” House Energy and Commerce Committee Republicans said in a statement Friday. “Even under CBO’s ‘best estimate,’ President Obama will have broken his promise to 3 million to 5 million Americans each year, but unfortunately, that number could be much higher.”

Supporters of the law say it’s not as bad as all that. The 20 million figure is the extreme scenario, they point out — CBO says that 3 million to 5 million is more likely. And that’s out of the 161 million Americans who would have had workplace health insurance before the law was passed.

Even in that case, the number is misleading, according to Topher Spiro of the Center for American Progress, because CBO says about 3 million wouldn’t be forced out. They would leave their workplace coverage voluntarily — possibly for better coverage, with subsidies, through the law’s new health insurance exchanges.

And for the rest, Spiro said, employers will have to take the responsibility for what happens — because they’ll still have plenty of incentives to offer coverage to their workers, especially once the individual mandate requires everyone to have it. “If they decide to drop coverage, that will be their decision, and they should not blame the health care law,” Spiro said.

But try explaining all that over the 30-second Republican campaign ads that are sure to come. And it’s not what Obama promised as he pushed for the new law two years ago.

“If you like your plan and you like your doctor, you won’t have to do a thing,” Obama promised at a press briefing in June 2009. “You keep your plan; you keep your doctor. If your employer’s providing you good health insurance, terrific. We’re not going to mess with it.”

The estimate of 3 million to 5 million is also a net figure, so it masks some bigger changes in both directions.

For one thing, CBO says 11 million Americans won’t get employment-based health insurance they would have had before the law — so they will be forced out (technically by their employer, not by the president, but the context will be the changes brought about by the health law). Another 9 million would gain coverage — but everyone who loses it will see their lives disrupted, and it will be used as more evidence of broken Obama promises.

But all of that assumes CBO is right. For the law’s supporters, the dream scenario is that employment-based coverage will go up — which is what happened in Massachusetts under Mitt Romney’s health care reform law, which (as his Republican rivals have been known to point out) also has an individual mandate. According to the state’s figures, the percentage of employers that offer health coverage has increased from 70 percent to 77 percent since 2005.

2) Costs aren’t going to go down.

The video released by the Obama campaign Thursday has a graph that shows health insurance premiums climbing and climbing — way above general inflation. Giving families and businesses relief was a big part of Obama’s sales pitch for health care reform.

“Health care costs had been rising three times the rate of inflation, crushing family budgets and choking businesses. And he knew that he couldn’t fix the economy if he didn’t fix health care,” narrator Tom Hanks says in the video.

But no matter what happens with the law, the line on that graph isn’t going to go down. If the law works as the administration hopes, premiums may not rise as fast. But they’re not going to plummet.

That’s because the main drivers of rising costs — including technology, expensive new drugs, an aging population, a surge in chronic diseases, and Americans’ propensity to use a lot more health care than many other countries, even if it doesn’t make them any healthier — have nothing to do with the law.

It’s not clear whether a lot of people actually expected premiums to go down — but there’s already a perception that the law has increased the cost of insurance, which is feeding the negative attitudes. A Kaiser Family Foundation poll released this week found that 49 percent believe the law has “significantly increased the price of health insurance.”

That’s not true. An Aon Hewitt survey of health plans found that health insurance premiums on average rose 12.3 percent in 2011 — but only an average of 1.5 percent can be attributed to the health law. And health premiums had been rising for years before the law was passed.

But what is true is that what most people pay for their insurance — either through higher premiums or bigger co-pays and deductibles — aren’t rising more slowly. The law creates lots of experiments for delivering health care more efficiently, but those are just getting underway. If those don’t work, and costs keep rising, the law will get blamed for it.

3) It’s just a guess that the law can pay for itself.

The Obama administration insists that the health care law will actually reduce the deficit — which sounds like a fantasy to many people, since the law will clearly increase spending through insurance subsidies and an expansion of Medicaid.

But that’s what CBO says. And it’s because the budget office believes the law will pay for itself through cuts in Medicare payments and various new taxes, including fees that health insurers and medical device makers will pay.

Like everything else CBO does, though, those estimates are mostly educated guesses — and they assume Congress is actually going to let the Medicare cuts happen. For example, the law is supposed to save $157 billion over 10 years by increasing Medicare payments more slowly for inpatient hospital, home health and skilled nursing facility services. The law expects those providers to become more productive and more efficient. But watch for plenty of lobbying pressure on Congress to cancel those cuts.

4) “The more they know, the more they’ll like it” isn’t happening.

When the bill passed, Democrats were convinced that Americans would like the health care reform law more once they were able to see its benefits. When then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Congress had to “pass the bill so you can find out what is in it” — an inartful phrase that Republicans have happily quoted ever since — her aides insisted that’s what she meant: People would find out about its benefits once the controversy died down.

Except the controversy has never died down, and people don’t like the law any more now than they did then.

The latest Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that 41 percent had favorable views of the law, while 40 percent had unfavorable views. That’s down from the 46 percent who favored the law in April 2010, right after Obama signed it.

And people actually seem to know less about what’s in the law than they did then. Only 56 percent now know that people will get subsidies to pay for health insurance, compared to the 75 percent who knew in April 2010. Just over half of Americans knew that people with pre-existing conditions will be guaranteed coverage, compared to the 64 percent who knew it in 2010.

The part the most people knew about is the individual mandate — the least popular part of the law. And once the Supreme Court starts hearing the health care reform case on March 26, they’ll hear about that part even more.

Modified from a Political.com article

0

CBO: Health law could cause as many as 20M to lose coverage

As many as 20 million Americans could lose their employer-provided coverage because of President Obama’s healthcare reform law, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in a new report Thursday.

The figure represents the worst-case scenario, CBO says, and the law could just as well increase the number of people with employer-based coverage by 3 million in 2019.

The best estimate, subject to a “tremendous amount of uncertainty,” is that about 3 million to 5 million fewer people will obtain coverage through their employer each year from 2019 through 2022.

The new report adds more detail to this week’s update of the law’s coverage provisions, which CBO released Tuesday. Compared to a year ago, the law is now anticipated to cover 2 million fewer people but cost $50 billion less over 10 years, after factoring penalties paid by individuals and businesses that don’t get or provide healthcare coverage.

Republicans immediately pounced after the new numbers came out because they appear to violate Obama’s pledge that people who like their health plans will be able to keep them. Last year, CBO’s best estimate was that only 1 million people would lose employer-sponsored coverage.

“President Obama’s string of empty promises is quickly becoming a disappointing trail of broken promises,” House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said in a statement. “He promised Americans that his overhaul of the health care sector would not jeopardize the health coverage of those who liked what they had. As nonpartisan analysts made clear today, millions of Americans will soon learn the hard way that Washington’s overreach into their health care decisions will result in sharp disruptions to their coverage and their care.”

Under CBO’s best estimate, 11 million mostly low-wage workers would lose their employer coverage. About 3 million would choose to drop their coverage to go into the new subsidized health exchanges or on Medicaid, while another 9 million would gain employer-sponsored coverage, for a net total of 5 million people losing employer coverage in 2019.

CBO defended its methodology Thursday after Republicans highlighted business surveys that found a bigger number of employers threatening to drop coverage because of the law.

“Some observers have expressed surprise that CBO and [the Joint Committee on Taxation] have not expected a much larger reduction in the number of people receiving employment-based health insurance in light of the expanded availability of subsidized health insurance coverage that will result from the” health law, the report says.

“CBO and JCT’s estimates take account of that expansion, but they also recognize that the legislation leaves in place some financial incentives and also creates new financial incentives for firms to offer and for many people to obtain health insurance coverage through their employers,” the report adds.

Employer surveys, CBO said, “have uncertain value and offer conflicting findings.”

“One piece of evidence that may be relevant is the experience in Massachusetts, where employment-based health insurance coverage appears to have increased since that state’s reforms, which are similar but not identical to those in the [federal health law], were implemented,” the agency said.

Modified from The Hill.com article.

0

Survey: Health Care Reform Law Driving Employers’ Group Health Costs Up

While most employers have not yet calculated the financial impact of compliance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, some estimate compliance with the law has driven their group health costs up by as much as 5 percent, according to a Willis Group Holdings P.L.C. survey released on March 8. The survey, conducted in December by Willis’ New York-based Human Capital Practice division, indicated that only 27 percent of responding employers have determined what it has cost their company to comply with the health care reform law in the two years since its implementation.

Among those employers, more than 55 percent said their total health care costs had risen at least 2 percent as a direct result of the reforms. More than 15 percent of those employers said their costs have risen in excess of 5 percent since 2010.

To offset those rising expenses, 62 percent of responding employers said they expect their peers to raise employee contributions for health care coverage. About 56 percent said they expect other employers to increase their plans’ deductibles and copayments, while 51 percent said they think employers will shift more of the cost burden for dependent care to their workers. “Now that the health care reform act has entered the implementation phase, the costs and benefits associated with the act are coming into greater focus for employers,” Jay Kirschbaum, practice leader for Willis Human Capital Practice, said in a statement released March 8. “The survey suggests employers realize that costs of providing medical benefits will increase and that they will likely have to pass those costs on to their employees.”

Among companies that had measured the cost of compliance with the health care reforms, a little more than half said the cost increases had been driven primarily by a provision of the health care reform law requiring employers to offer coverage to employees’ adult children up to age 26. Almost 37 percent said the rule eliminating annual and lifetime coverage limits for “essential health benefits” was responsible for their increases.

Despite the increased costs, 57 percent of responding employers said they plan to expand their group health plans to comply with health care reform requirements. About two-thirds said it was unlikely that they would reduce financial support for other employee benefits, such as dental, disability and life insurance, while just 27 percent said they would likely cut back on contributions to tax-qualified employee benefits like pensions and 401(k) accounts.

“Respondents also indicated the new requirements will force them to think about their benefits in a strategic manner and as part of the total rewards they use to attract, retain and motivate employees,” Kirschbaum said. More than 2,300 employers responded to the survey, with 69 percent reporting fewer than 500 full-time employees, Willis said.

0

Execs say California health care reform inevitable

Health care reform will happen in California regardless of whether the federal Affordable Care Act is upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court , Sacramento-area health care leaders said Friday.

Other panelists were Pat Brady, chief executive officer of Sutter Roseville Medical Center; Garry Maisel, president and chief executive officer of Western Health Advantage;  Ann Madden Rice, chief executive officer of UC Davis Medical Center; Darryl Cardoza, chief operating officer of Hill Physicians Medical Group; and Trish Rodriguez, senior vice president and hospital chief executive officer for Kaiser Permanente in South Sacramento and Elk Grove.

Everyone is affected by the rising cost of health care, including employers, Rodriguez noted. After wages, health care benefits are the second largest operating cost at Kaiser Permanente itself, she said.

Doctors, hospitals and health plans will have to work together to go the same direction, the executives said. And it will take shared resources to get there because trends in health care — regardless of the fate of the reform law — will mean more demands on the industry and lower reimbursements, speakers agreed.

The key will be a switch from a medical rescue system that fixes problems to a health care delivery system that keeps people healthy and provides more care in less-expensive outpatient settings, Cardoza said.

Money is a growing problem: more costs are coming and reimbursement will drop.

  • While more people will have coverage when health insurance exchanges start in 2014, Medi-Cal enrollment is expected to climb. The government health care program for the poor has one of the lowest rates in the nation and reimbursement from Medicare — the government health care program for seniors — is slated for huge cuts.
  • To make ends meet while serving more patients, all parts of the health care system will have to cut costs and be more efficient.

One unknown is the health of the millions of new patients who will get coverage in two years.

  • “We do know these people; they are accessing our health care system now through ERs,” said Rodriguez of Kaiser Permanente. “We have an opportunity to do it in a more controlled environment, and I’d make sure these individuals are seen in primary care physicians’ offices.”

There will have to be more doctors to make that happen.

“If you look at Massachusetts (where universal health care is already in place), it used to take 16 to 18 days for a non-urgent internal medicine appoint,” said Rice of UC Davis Medical Center. “It’s gone one up to six weeks.”

  •  Three-quarters of the counties in California have fewer than 60 primary-care doctors, she said. The UC Davis School of Medicine — and other medical schools — can churn out more doctors, but there aren’t enough residency spots to accommodate them, Rice said.

“The individual market will look nothing like it does today; the small group market will change, too, but not as much,” Maisel said of the industry in 2014.

  • “Now it’s business to business, through brokers. It’s going to be a business-to-consumer model.
  • The buying decision will no longer be at the employer level, but at the individual level.”

Contrary to perceptions that the cost of health care will go down in 2014, Maisel thinks they’ll go up in the short-term because of demand and slow changes to the delivery system.

  • “In 2014, a lot of individuals think they’ll suddenly go out and buy affordable health care,” he said. “I think there will be sticker shock.”

This article is modified from a Sacramento Business Journal Article published March 2, 2012

0

Employer-offered health insurance drops to record low

By Kathryn Mayer

The number of Americans getting health insurance from their employer continues to drop, with a record low 44.6 percent getting employer-sponsored coverage in 2011, compared to 45.8 percent in 2010, according to Gallup numbers.

This continues the downward trend Gallup and Healthways have documented for the last few years. In 2008, roughly half of Americans received health insurance from their employer.

Meanwhile, Gallup says, the percentage of Americans who are uninsured has also increased, rising to 17.1 percent this year, the highest seen since 2008.

Increased unemployment is one factor in this trend, but cost and availability are others. Either some workers can no longer afford the rising cost of health insurance the employer offers, Gallup research notes, or simply put, the employer is not offering health insurance any longer.

Additionally, the proportion of the U.S. work force that is composed of part-time workers—a group less likely to receive employer-based health insurance than full-time workers—has increased.

Employer-based health insurance declined among most major population subgroups last year, with the exception of young adults and seniors. It also is down significantly compared with 2008 across all groups.

High-income Americans are by far the most likely to say they get their health insurance from an employer, with 70.4 percent doing so in 2011. Low-income Americans are among the least likely to have employer-based health coverage, at 23.7 percent.

“If this trend continues, it is likely that the percentage of Americans who get their health insurance from their employer will continue to decline,” Gallup reports. “Whether more Americans then become uninsured or are able to gain access to coverage may be largely reliant on the fate of the health care law.”

The Gallup survey was conducted Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2011, with a random sample of 353,492 adults. The margin of error is plus or minus 1 percentage point.

0

Annual PCIP Member Claims Average $28,994 – Will this be the trend after 2014?

The Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) — a new health insurance program for people with health problems — ended 2011 with 48,879 enrollees. The consumers who have enrolled have turned out to be far sicker than officials had anticipated: Enrollees are averaging about $29,000 in claims per year. That’s twice the average traditional state high risk pools have experienced in recent years, officials say. Many PCIP participants need treatment for conditions such as cancer, ischemic heart disease, degenerative bone diseases or hemophilia.

People who enroll in the PCIP program are not charged a higher premium because of their medical condition. Premiums may vary only on the basis of age, geographic area and tobacco use. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) requires health insurers to sell subsidized coverage on a guaranteed issue, mostly community-rated basis starting in 2014.

Officials say that other program features may contribute to high per-member medical costs. “Coverage related to the care or treatment of an enrollee’s pre-existing condition begins immediately upon the plan’s effective date, unlike other types of insurance coverage currently available in the individual market, which may impose pre-existing condition limits or exclusion periods,” officials say.

  “PCIP may attract individuals who have been recently diagnosed with a severe illness or condition that requires immediate care or treatment”.  “Additionally, people who may otherwise qualify for PCIP may postpone enrolling until they have an immediate need for coverage.”

*This article is modified from a Life Health Pro article by Elizabeth Festa

0