Archive | Taxes

Why HRAs Will Become the Foundation of Employee Health Benefits

New business methods and technology now allow employers to enroll employees in a single HRA software platform from which employees access their:

  1.     HRA benefits
  2.     HSA link to any financial institution
  3.     A Private Exchange for purchasing individual/family health insurance

HRAs started out as supplements to employer health benefit plans for incidental items not covered by traditional health insurance plans. However, because of their enormous legal flexibility and new technology designed to take advantage of this flexibility, HRAs will become the foundation of every employer’s health benefit plan.

For employers who offer group insurance, HRAs will become the front-end delivery vehicle of primary health benefits for fully-insured and self-insured plans. For employers who cannot afford a group health plan, HRAs are becoming the basis of a defined contribution health plan that enables millions of employees to purchase individual/family health insurance policies directly from an insurance company.

Whether as the front-end of an employer-sponsored group plan or defined contribution health plan, here are just a few ways HRAs can deliver better and more cost-effective health benefits to employers and their employees today.

(1) HRAs Improve Retention

The greatest challenge for employers today is retaining qualified employees. HRAs are extremely powerful for retention because employees accumulate for their future what they don’t spend today, but lose their accumulated balance when they quit (unless they meet employer-specified HRA retiree vesting requirements).  Additionally, employers can vary HRA benefits by class of employee to create further incentives for employees to stay and grow.

(2) HRAs Boost Recruiting Success

The second greatest challenge facing employers today is recruiting quality employees, whether for salaried and hourly positions. HRAs are the ultimate employee recruiting tool because they allow employers to afford and offer much better health benefits than their competition. In addition, using HRAs enables employers with group plans to offer better coverage to new employees by doing the following:

HRAs Eliminate Waiting Periods – New employees can enroll, submit claims, and have their claims approved for reimbursement, but not actually be reimbursed until the waiting period (e.g. six months) is complete.
HRAs Provide Coverage for Hourly, Part-time, or Seasonal Employees – Employees can receive HRA allowances tied to their hours worked but forfeit their entire HRA balance unless they work a minimum number of hours or return (after a seasonal layoff) within a specified time period.

(3) Allocate HRA Benefits by Class

Employers have always been allowed to allocate health benefits by using reasonable classifications with wages and retirement, giving different health benefits to employees based of job categories, geographical locations, etc.

But, before HRAs, employers lacked the technology and systems to offer health benefits packages tailored for each Class of Employee based on their recruiting and retention objectives. New HRA technology allows employers to set-up a completely different benefits plan for each Class of Employee (e.g. call center staff, managers, executives) and electronically administer such a different HRA benefits plan with electronic signatures and customized per-class plan documents and HRA SPDs (Summary Plan Descriptions).

(4) HRAs Improve Coverage for All Employees

Besides rising costs, every employee and employer has something they don’t like about their health benefits. HRAs allow employers virtually unlimited flexibility to add benefits (such as smoking cessation, weight loss programs, maternity supplements, or improved coverage for out-of-network providers).  Online tools connected to the claims processing system allow employers to monitor and control the cost of these additional benefits in real-time.

(5) Implement and capture savings from high deductible plans using HRAs

Using HRAs enables employees to move to high deductible plans.  Employers with fully-insured group plans can immediately save up to 50% on their existing group premium without reducing any benefits by switching to a higher annual deductible, and using their HRA to pay employee medical expenses under the new deductible. Employers who do this typically then give back about 1/3 to 1/2 of their savings to maintain the same level of benefits—for a net savings of 15%-30% after HRA reimbursements. Similarly, employers who use HRAs without a group plan can provide employees with funds to offset out of pocket expenses associated with lower-priced high deductible personal health policy.

These compelling benefits make HRAs a logical vehicle for employers of all sizes.

*Modified from a Zane Benefits Blog

 

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Ravenous Congress Will Tax Jobs Out Of Existence For ObamaCare

By George Will

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Bill Hewlett and David Packard, tinkering in a California garage, began what became Hewlett-Packard. Steve Jobs and a friend built a computer in the California garage that became Apple’s birthplace. Bill Cook had no garage, so he launched Cook Medical in a spare bedroom in an apartment in this university town.

Half a century ago, in flight from Chicago’s winters, he settled here and began making cardiovascular catheters and other medical instruments. One thing led to another, as things have a way of doing when the government stays out of the way, and although Cook died last year, Cook Medical, with its subsidiaries, is the world’s largest family-owned medical devices company.

In 2010, however, Congress, ravenous for revenues to fund ObamaCare, included in the legislation a 2.3% tax on gross revenues — which generally amounts to about a 15% tax on most manufacturers’ profits — from U.S. sales of medical devices beginning in 2013.

This will be piled on top of the 35% federal corporate tax, and state and local taxes. The 2.3% tax will be a $20 billion blow to an industry that employs more than 400,000, and $20 billion is almost double the industry’s annual investment in research and development.

An axiom of scarcity is understood by people not warped by working for the federal government, which can print money when it wearies of borrowing it. The axiom is: A unit of something — time, energy, money — spent on this cannot be spent on that.

So the 2.3% tax, unless repealed, will mean not only fewer jobs but also fewer pain-reducing and life-extending inventions — stents, implantable defibrillators, etc. — which have reduced health care costs.

The tax might, however, be repealed. The medical device industry is widely dispersed across the country, so numerous members of Congress have constituencies affected by developments such as these:

Cook Medical is no longer planning to open a U.S. factory a year. Boston Scientific, planning for a more than $100 million charge against earnings in 2013, recently built a $35 million research and development facility in Ireland and is building a $150 million factory in China. (Capital goes where it is welcome and stays where it is well-treated.)

Stryker Corp., based in Michigan, blames the tax for 1,000 layoffs. Zimmer, based in Indiana, is laying off 450 and taking a $50 million charge against earnings. Medtronic expects an annual charge against earnings of $175 million. Covidien, now based in Ireland, has cited the tax in explaining 200 layoffs and a decision to move some production to Costa Rica and Mexico.

Already 235 members of the House of Representatives — 227 Republicans and eight Democrats — are co-sponsors of a bill to repeal the tax. Twenty-three Republican senators, but no Democratic senators, favor repeal.

The Democrats who imposed this tax on a single manufacturing sector justified this discrimination by saying ObamaCare would be a boon to the medical devices industry because, by expanding insurance coverage, it would stimulate demand for devices. But those insured because of Obama-Care will be disproportionately young and not needing, say, artificial knees. And well before ObamaCare, the law had long required hospitals to provide devices to the needy who are uninsured.

Unsurprisingly, Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., supports repeal of the tax. Surprisingly, so does his opponent, Elizabeth Warren, an impeccably liberal ObamaCare enthusiast who notes that in Massachusetts, the medical devices industry has 24,000 employees and accounts for 13% of the state’s exports.

Warren is experiencing another episode of New England remorse: “When Congress taxes the sale of a specific product through an excise tax … it too often disproportionately impacts the small companies with the narrowest financial margins and the broadest innovative potential.”

Well, yes. In 1990, when President George H.W. Bush’s recanted his “no new taxes” pledge, he enabled the Democratic-controlled Congress, with a legion of New England liberals in the lead, to impose a 10% tax on yachts costing more than $100,000.

Yacht sales plunged 70% in six months, a third of all yacht-building companies — many in New England — stopped production and more than 20,000 workers lost their jobs. In 1993, the tax, although not the damage, was repealed.

Given humanity’s fallen condition, almost everyone’s tax policy is: “Don’t tax you, don’t tax me, tax that fellow behind the tree.” There are, however, vulnerable wealth-and-job-creating businesses behind most

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Every Small Business Needs to Know About These Potential Regulatory Changes

Paychex Inc. released its list of the top 12 potential regulatory changes that small businesses need to know about in 2012. Paychex works closely with the IRS and other government agencies and is constantly monitoring regulatory and compliance-related matters.

• Health Coverage W2 – The IRS further delayed a requirement for smaller employers to report the cost of employer-sponsored health coverage on employee Forms W-2, indefinitely postponing it until further guidance is issued. However, employers that file 250 or more Forms W-2 in 2011 must include this cost on the W-2 starting in tax year 2012. The healthcare amounts reported on the W-2 will be strictly informational and not taxable to the employee.

• Healthcare Reform – The Supreme Court is expected to rule in 2012 on the constitutionality of the individual mandate provision in the Affordable Care Act.

• 401(k) – In 2012, 401(k) service providers will have to make additional fee disclosures to plan sponsors and plan sponsors will have to make additional fee disclosures to participants. Contribution limits will increase in 2012. Regulations will be enacted in 2012 or are under consideration to broaden the definition of a plan fiduciary, make investment advice more accessible to plan participants, and restrict the number of loans an employee can take from their 401(k).

• Job Creation – Congress passed legislation in 2011 to provide a tax credit for hiring veterans. The temporary reduction of employee payroll taxes was due to expire on December 31, 2011, but Congress extended the provision for two more months. A new recapture provision applies to employees who earn more than $18,350 during the two-month period.  The tax cut could extend through 2012, pending further negotiations. Congress is considering additional measures, such as earmarking funding for infrastructure projects and passing measures to help small businesses access capital.

• Worker Classification – IRS is allowing eligible employers to reclassify workers as employees in exchange for partial tax relief from past federal employment taxes. In late 2011, the Dept. of Labor agreed to work with the IRS and several states to coordinate enforcement. Legislation in several states to increase fines for worker misclassification may affect employers in 2012.

• Deficit Reduction – Proposed legislation focuses on reducing the deficit through spending reductions and tax increases. Many of the ideas involve reforming personal and business tax and closing of tax loopholes.

• Immigration – The federal government is conducting rigorous worksite enforcement and paperwork inspections of companies of all sizes to crack down on the employment of illegal immigrants. In 2012, state laws will require more private sector employers to use the federal E-verify system for employee verification. Also possible in 2012 are Congressional immigration reform proposals that may include additional federal employment verification obligations.

• Employment Law – Many states restrict employers from using an employee’s credit information in employment-related decisions or are considering these resrictions. The Dept. of Labor and many states have enacted or are considering regulations to provide greater transparency of pay checks. These regulations focus on how workers’ pay is calculated, especially as it relates to minimum wage and overtime requirements.

• Security and Privacy – Cybercrime and corporate bank account takeovers against small businesses are becoming more widespread. Employers should take security precautions, such as using stand-alone computers for online banking; not clicking on attachments or hyperlinks from unknown sources; and working with their bank to implement fraud detection tools on their accounts. Many states have enacted onerous privacy and security breach regulations.

• Dodd-Frank – The sweeping Dodd-Frank financial law is focused primarily on Wall Street reforms and consumer protection. However small businesses may face limited access to credit and higher costs of credit or other financial services because of the increased burden it places on some industries.

• Unemployment Insurance – Virtually all businesses will face higher unemployment insurance taxes if Congress reinstates the federal unemployment surtax. In many states, employers will see higher taxes because of the repayment of outstanding federal loans that were taken to continue paying benefits and replenish depleted state unemployment trust funds. Many states are cosidering additional employer reporting requirements to combat unemployment insurance fraud.

• Taxes – 2012 will bring a number of important tax changes including a higher Social Security wage base and changes to  assistance benefit limits. The accelerated depreciation benefits, which were in place in 2011, may expire or be scaled back in 2012. All employers will need to keep an eye on what are likely to be additional tax changes as the year progresses.

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OBAMA SIGNS REPEAL OF HEALTHCARE LAW’S ‘1099’ TAX-REPORTING RULE

The Washington Post –

Apr. 14: President Obama on Thursday signed into law a measure that repeals the unpopular 1099 tax-reporting provision of the national health-care law.

The move marked the first successful effort by Congress to repeal a portion of Obama’s signature health-care legislation. The Senate earlier this month voted 87-to-12 to repeal the 1099 provision. The House passed the measure in March on a bipartisan 314-to-112 vote.

The White House released a statement announcing the Obama had signed the measure, which it said “repeals the expansion in the Affordable Care Act of requirements for businesses to report information to the Internal Revenue Service on payments for goods of $600 or more annually to other businesses and increases the amount of overpayment subject to repayment of premium assistance tax credits for health insurance coverage purchases through the Exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act.”

Obama’s signing of the legislation into law marks the end of a nearly eight-month-long effort by lawmakers to do away with the 1099 tax-reporting provision. Sen. Mike Johanns (R-Neb.) had led the effort in the Senate, but each time repeal seemed close, the parties reached an impasse over how to pay for the repeal, which would result in the loss of an estimated $22 billion over the next decade.

The law signed by Obama on Thursday would pay for repeal by forcing greater repayment of health insurance subsidies for families whose income unexpectedly exceeds certain thresholds.

Johanns lauded the signing in a statement Thursday evening. “Job creators can finally celebrate: the 1099 tax paperwork mandate is officially off the books,” Johanns said.

“Because of the resilience of small business owners everywhere in keeping this issue at the forefront, because of the good judgment of my colleagues in both houses in recognizing the foolishness of this mandate, and now because of the President’s signature, our job creators can go about their business without fear of being hammered by mountains of additional, unnecessary tax paperwork.”

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The Whole Foods Alternative to ObamaCare

Eight things we can do to improve health care without adding to the deficit


by John Mackey

“The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money.”

— Margaret Thatcher

With a projected $1.8 trillion deficit for 2009, several trillions more in deficits projected over the next decade, and with both Medicare and Social Security entitlement spending about to ratchet up several notches over the next 15 years as Baby Boomers become eligible for both, we are rapidly running out of other people’s money. These deficits are simply not sustainable. They are either going to result in unprecedented new taxes and inflation, or they will bankrupt us.

While we clearly need health-care reform, the last thing our country needs is a massive new health-care entitlement that will create hundreds of billions of dollars of new unfunded deficits and move us much closer to a government takeover of our health-care system. Instead, we should be trying to achieve reforms by moving in the opposite direction–toward less government control and more individual empowerment. Here are eight reforms that would greatly lower the cost of health care for everyone:

• Remove the legal obstacles that slow the creation of high-deductible health insurance plans and health savings accounts (HSAs). The combination of high-deductible health insurance and HSAs is one solution that could solve many of our health-care problems. For example, Whole Foods Market pays 100% of the premiums for all our team members who work 30 hours or more per week (about 89% of all team members) for our high-deductible health-insurance plan. We also provide up to $1,800 per year in additional health-care dollars through deposits into employees’ Personal Wellness Accounts to spend as they choose on their own health and wellness.

Money not spent in one year rolls over to the next and grows over time. Our team members therefore spend their own health-care dollars until the annual deductible is covered (about $2,500) and the insurance plan kicks in. This creates incentives to spend the first $2,500 more carefully. Our plan’s costs are much lower than typical health insurance, while providing a very high degree of worker satisfaction.

• Equalize the tax laws so that employer-provided health insurance and individually owned health insurance have the same tax benefits. Now employer health insurance benefits are fully tax deductible, but individual health insurance is not. This is unfair.

• Repeal all state laws which prevent insurance companies from competing across state lines. We should all have the legal right to purchase health insurance from any insurance company in any state and we should be able use that insurance wherever we live. Health insurance should be portable.

• Repeal government mandates regarding what insurance companies must cover. These mandates have increased the cost of health insurance by billions of dollars. What is insured and what is not insured should be determined by individual customer preferences and not through special-interest lobbying.

• Enact tort reform to end the ruinous lawsuits that force doctors to pay insurance costs of hundreds of thousands of dollars per year. These costs are passed back to us through much higher prices for health care.

• Make costs transparent so that consumers understand what health-care treatments cost. How many people know the total cost of their last doctor’s visit and how that total breaks down? What other goods or services do we buy without knowing how much they will cost us?

• Enact Medicare reform. We need to face up to the actuarial fact that Medicare is heading towards bankruptcy and enact reforms that create greater patient empowerment, choice and responsibility.

• Finally, revise tax forms to make it easier for individuals to make a voluntary, tax-deductible donation to help the millions of people who have no insurance and aren’t covered by Medicare, Medicaid or the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Many promoters of health-care reform believe that people have an intrinsic ethical right to health care–to equal access to doctors, medicines and hospitals. While all of us empathize with those who are sick, how can we say that all people have more of an intrinsic right to health care than they have to food or shelter?

Health care is a service that we all need, but just like food and shelter it is best provided through voluntary and mutually beneficial market exchanges. A careful reading of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution will not reveal any intrinsic right to health care, food or shelter. That’s because there isn’t any. This “right” has never existed in America

Even in countries like Canada and the U.K., there is no intrinsic right to health care. Rather, citizens in these countries are told by government bureaucrats what health-care treatments they are eligible to receive and when they can receive them. All countries with socialized medicine ration health care by forcing their citizens to wait in lines to receive scarce treatments.

Although Canada has a population smaller than California, 830,000 Canadians are currently waiting to be admitted to a hospital or to get treatment, according to a report last month in Investor’s Business Daily. In England, the waiting list is 1.8 million.

At Whole Foods we allow our team members to vote on what benefits they most want the company to fund. Our Canadian and British employees express their benefit preferences very clearly–they want supplemental health-care dollars that they can control and spend themselves without permission from their governments. Why would they want such additional health-care benefit dollars if they already have an “intrinsic right to health care”? The answer is clear–no such right truly exists in either Canada or the U.K.–or in any other country.

Rather than increase government spending and control, we need to address the root causes of poor health. This begins with the realization that every American adult is responsible for his or her own health.

Unfortunately many of our health-care problems are self-inflicted: two-thirds of Americans are now overweight and one-third are obese. Most of the diseases that kill us and account for about 70% of all health-care spending–heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes and obesity–are mostly preventable through proper diet, exercise, not smoking, minimal alcohol consumption and other healthy lifestyle choices.

Recent scientific and medical evidence shows that a diet consisting of foods that are plant-based, nutrient dense and low-fat will help prevent and often reverse most degenerative diseases that kill us and are expensive to treat. We should be able to live largely disease-free lives until we are well into our 90s and even past 100 years of age.

Health-care reform is very important. Whatever reforms are enacted it is essential that they be financially responsible, and that we have the freedom to choose doctors and the health-care services that best suit our own unique set of lifestyle choices. We are all responsible for our own lives and our own health. We should take that responsibility very seriously and use our freedom to make wise lifestyle choices that will protect our health. Doing so will enrich our lives and will help create a vibrant and sustainable American society.

Mr. Mackey is co-founder and CEO of Whole Foods Market Inc.

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Comprehensive List of Tax Hikes in Obamacare

From Ryan Ellis on Friday, January 14, 2011 6:00 AM

Next week, the U.S. House of Representatives will be voting on an historic repeal of the Obamacare law.  While there are many reasons to oppose this flawed government health insurance law, it is important to remember that Obamacare is also one of the largest tax increases in American history.  Below is a comprehensive list of the two dozen new or higher taxes that pay for Obamcare’s expansion of government spending and interference between doctors and patients.

Individual Mandate Excise Tax(Jan 2014): Starting in 2014, anyone not buying “qualifying” health insurance must pay an income surtax according to the higher of the following

1 Adult 2 Adults 3+ Adults
2014 1% AGI/$95 1% AGI/$190 1% AGI/$285
2015 2% AGI/$325 2% AGI/$650 2% AGI/$975
2016 + 2.5% AGI/$695 2.5% AGI/$1390 2.5% AGI/$2085

Exemptions for religious objectors, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, those earning less than the poverty line, members of Indian tribes, and hardship cases (determined by HHS)

Employer Mandate Tax(Jan 2014):  If an employer does not offer health coverage, and at least one employee qualifies for a health tax credit, the employer must pay an additional non-deductible tax of $2000 for all full-time employees.  This provision applies to all employers with 50 or more employees. If any employee actually receives coverage through the exchange, the penalty on the employer for that employee rises to $3000. If the employer requires a waiting period to enroll in coverage of 30-60 days, there is a $400 tax per employee ($600 if the period is 60 days or longer).

Combined score of individual and employer mandate tax penalty: $65 billion/10 years

Surtax on Investment Income ($123 billion/Jan. 2013):  This increase involves the creation of a new, 3.8 percent surtax on investment income earned in households making at least $250,000 ($200,000 single).  This would result in the following top tax rates on investment income

Capital Gains Dividends Other*
2010-2012 15% 15% 35%
2013+ (current law) 23.8% 43.4% 43.4%
2013+ (Obama budget) 23.8% 23.8% 43.4%
*Other unearned income includes (for surtax purposes) gross income from interest, annuities, royalties, net rents, and passive income in partnerships and Subchapter-S corporations.  It does not include municipal bond interest or life insurance proceeds, since those do not add to gross income.  It does not include active trade or business income, fair market value sales of ownership in pass-through entities, or distributions from retirement plans.  The 3.8% surtax does not apply to non-resident aliens.

Excise Tax on Comprehensive Health Insurance Plans($32 bil/Jan 2018): Starting in 2018, new 40 percent excise tax on “Cadillac” health insurance plans ($10,200 single/$27,500 family). For early retirees and high-risk professions exists a higher threshold ($11,500 single/$29,450 family).  CPI +1 percentage point indexed.

Hike in Medicare Payroll Tax($86.8 bil/Jan 2013): Current law and changes:

First $200,000
($250,000 Married)
Employer/Employee
All Remaining Wages
Employer/Employee
Current Law 1.45%/1.45%
2.9% self-employed
1.45%/1.45%
2.9% self-employed
Obamacare Tax Hike 1.45%/1.45%
2.9% self-employed
1.45%/2.35%
3.8% self-employed

Medicine Cabinet Tax($5 bil/Jan 2011): Americans no longer able to use health savings account (HSA), flexible spending account (FSA), or health reimbursement (HRA) pre-tax dollars to purchase non-prescription, over-the-counter medicines (except insulin)

HSA Withdrawal Tax Hike($1.4 bil/Jan 2011): Increases additional tax on non-medical early withdrawals from an HSA from 10 to 20 percent, disadvantaging them relative to IRAs and other tax-advantaged accounts, which remain at 10 percent.

Flexible Spending Account Cap – aka“Special Needs Kids Tax”($13 bil/Jan 2013): Imposes cap of $2500 (Indexed to inflation after 2013) on FSAs (now unlimited). . There is one group of FSA owners for whom this new cap will be particularly cruel and onerous: parents of special needs children.  There are thousands of families with special needs children in the United States, and many of them use FSAs to pay for special needs education.  Tuition rates at one leading school that teaches special needs children in Washington, D.C. (National Child Research Center) can easily exceed $14,000 per year. Under tax rules, FSA dollars can be used to pay for this type of special needs education.

Tax on Medical Device Manufacturers($20 bil/Jan 2013): Medical device manufacturers employ 360,000 people in 6000 plants across the country. This law imposes a new 2.3% excise tax.  Exemptions include items retailing for less than $100.

Raise “Haircut” for Medical Itemized Deduction from 7.5% to 10% of AGI($15.2 bil/Jan 2013): Currently, those facing high medical expenses are allowed a deduction for medical expenses to the extent that those expenses exceed 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income (AGI).  The new provision imposes a threshold of 10 percent of AGI; it is waived for 65+ taxpayers in 2013-2016 only.

Tax on Indoor Tanning Services($2.7 billion/July 1, 2010): New 10 percent excise tax on Americans using indoor tanning salons

Elimination of tax deduction for employer-provided retirement Rx drug coverage in coordination with Medicare Part D($4.5 bil/Jan 2013)

Blue Cross/Blue Shield Tax Hike($0.4 bil/Jan 2010): The special tax deduction in current law for Blue Cross/Blue Shield companies would only be allowed if 85 percent or more of premium revenues are spent on clinical services

Excise Tax on Charitable Hospitals(Min$/immediate): $50,000 per hospital if they fail to meet new “community health assessment needs,” “financial assistance,” and “billing and collection” rules set by HHS

Tax on Innovator Drug Companies($22.2 bil/Jan 2010): $2.3 billion annual tax on the industry imposed relative to share of sales made that year.

Tax on Health Insurers($60.1 bil/Jan 2014): Annual tax on the industry imposed relative to health insurance premiums collected that year. The stipulation phases in gradually until 2018, and is fully-imposed on firms with $50 million in profits.

$500,000 Annual Executive Compensation Limit for Health Insurance Executives($0.6 bil/Jan 2013)

Employer Reporting of Insurance on W-2(Min$/Jan 2011): Preamble to taxing health benefits on individual tax returns.

Corporate 1099-MISC Information Reporting($17.1 bil/Jan 2012): Requires businesses to send 1099-MISC information tax forms to corporations (currently limited to individuals), a huge compliance burden for small employers

“Black liquor” tax hike(Tax hike of $23.6 billion).  This is a tax increase on a type of bio-fuel.

Codification of the “economic substance doctrine”(Tax hike of $4.5 billion).  This provision allows the IRS to disallow completely-legal tax deductions and other legal tax-minimizing plans just because the IRS deems that the action lacks “substance” and is merely intended to reduce taxes owed.

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What You Need To Know About The One‐Year Tax Deduction On Health Costs For The Self‐Employed

On September 27, 2010, the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010 (H.R.5297) was signed into law. The legislation provides an important tax break for the over 23 million self‐employed Americans that represent 78 percent of all small businesses in the U.S.

The self‐employed have not received the same tax benefit related to health insurance expenses that all other businesses entities have enjoyed. Various business entities are able to fully deduct the cost of health coverage as a business expense, saving them a significant amount in payroll taxes.

With the passage of the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act, the self‐employed will be allowed to take a one‐year tax deduction for health costs in determining payroll tax (self‐employment tax.) Here is some guidance to determine whether you can benefit from this new deduction:

1)  Who can qualify for this one‐year self‐employment tax deduction on health costs?

Self‐employed business owners that meet all of the following requirements can take advantage of this new tax deduction:

•    Files an IRS Form 1040 Schedule C tax form or Schedule E with earned income ‐ this includes sole proprietors, single member LLCs, and sole owner S‐Corporations.
•    Pays self‐employment taxes via IRS Form 1040 Schedule SE.
•    Pays for individual or family health coverage in 2010.

2)  When can I take this deduction?

This deduction is available for health costs paid by self‐employed business owners in 2010. Self‐ employed business owners should look to take advantage of this deduction when preparing their taxes next year in time for the April 15, 2011 tax filing deadline.

3)  How much will I save with this one‐year tax deduction on health costs?

The self‐employed must pay the employer and employee contribution to payroll taxes, totaling up to 15.3 percent on business income. For the self‐employed, payroll taxes are called self‐ employment taxes.

To calculate your savings from this new tax deduction, simply add up your total 2010 health insurance costs and multiply that by 15.3 percent. The resulting amount will represent how much you will save on your self‐employment taxes when filing your 2010 taxes next year.

According to a report on individual health insurance released by America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), annual premiums averaged $2,985 for single coverage and $6,328 for family plans nationwide in mid‐2009. A majority of the self‐employed with health coverage currently purchase it via the individual insurance market.

Based on these average premium costs, the new one‐year tax deduction on health costs for payroll tax purposes would save self‐employed business owners approximately $456.71 to $968.14 in taxes.

•    NOTE: If you qualify for this deduction and your annual income is above the maximum wage limit subject to payroll (FICA) taxes, currently $106,800, then you will receive a lower tax benefit. Please contact your tax professional to assist you with calculating your exact tax savings.

4)  What if I purchased health coverage mid‐year or am planning to purchase health coverage this year, will I still get the benefit from the tax deduction?

If you meet the above qualification requirements in Question 1, you can still benefit from this one‐year tax deduction.

Since the benefit of the deduction is larger for those with higher health costs, those who purchased coverage mid‐year or will be purchasing health insurance in 2010 will simply have a smaller tax benefit when they file their taxes in 2011.

5)  What are the next steps a self‐employed business owner should take to ensure they qualify and benefit from this one‐year self‐employment tax deduction on health costs?

Self‐employed business owners should inform their tax professional about this new one‐year tax deduction. Prior to filing your taxes next year, your tax professional can determine whether you qualify and can take this tax benefit.

6)  Why is this tax deduction benefiting the self‐employed only available for one‐year?

Lawmakers only extended this tax benefit to the self‐employed for one‐year to provide some temporary bottom‐line cost savings to America’s smallest businesses in this difficult economic time and also, to minimize the cost to the federal government.

It is important to reiterate that the self‐employed are the only business entities which do not receive a business deduction for their health care costs. All other businesses are able to fully deduct their health costs lowering their payroll tax liability. We feel that self‐employed should have the same tax treatment of health costs as all other businesses.

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Changing Stance, Administration Now Defends Insurance Mandate as a Tax

WASHINGTON — When Congress required most Americans to obtain health insurance or pay a penalty, Democrats denied that they were creating a new tax. But in court, the Obama administration and its allies now defend the requirement as an exercise of the government’s “power to lay and collect taxes.”

And that power, they say, is even more sweeping than the federal power to regulate interstate commerce.

Administration officials say the tax argument is a linchpin of their legal case in defense of the health care overhaul and its individual mandate, now being challenged in court by more than 20 states and several private organizations.

Under the legislation signed by President Obama in March, most Americans will have to maintain “minimum essential coverage” starting in 2014. Many people will be eligible for federal subsidies to help them pay premiums.

In a brief defending the law, the Justice Department says the requirement for people to carry insurance or pay the penalty is “a valid exercise” of Congress’s power to impose taxes.

Congress can use its taxing power “even for purposes that would exceed its powers under other provisions” of the Constitution, the department said. For more than a century, it added, the Supreme Court has held that Congress can tax activities that it could not reach by using its power to regulate commerce.

While Congress was working on the health care legislation, Mr. Obama refused to accept the argument that a mandate to buy insurance, enforced by financial penalties, was equivalent to a tax.

“For us to say that you’ve got to take a responsibility to get health insurance is absolutely not a tax increase,” the president said last September, in a spirited exchange with George Stephanopoulos on the ABC News program “This Week.”

When Mr. Stephanopoulos said the penalty appeared to fit the dictionary definition of a tax, Mr. Obama replied, “I absolutely reject that notion.”

Congress anticipated a constitutional challenge to the individual mandate. Accordingly, the law includes 10 detailed findings meant to show that the mandate regulates commercial activity important to the nation’s economy. Nowhere does Congress cite its taxing power as a source of authority.

Under the Constitution, Congress can exercise its taxing power to provide for the “general welfare.” It is for Congress, not courts, to decide which taxes are “conducive to the general welfare,” the Supreme Court said 73 years ago in upholding the Social Security Act.

Dan Pfeiffer, the White House communications director, described the tax power as an alternative source of authority.

“The Commerce Clause supplies sufficient authority for the shared-responsibility requirements in the new health reform law,” Mr. Pfeiffer said. “To the extent that there is any question of additional authority — and we don’t believe there is — it would be available through the General Welfare Clause.”

The law describes the levy on the uninsured as a “penalty” rather than a tax. The Justice Department brushes aside the distinction, saying “the statutory label” does not matter. The constitutionality of a tax law depends on “its practical operation,” not the precise form of words used to describe it, the department says, citing a long line of Supreme Court cases.

Moreover, the department says the penalty is a tax because it will raise substantial revenue: $4 billion a year by 2017, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

In addition, the department notes, the penalty is imposed and collected under the Internal Revenue Code, and people must report it on their tax returns “as an addition to income tax liability.”

Because the penalty is a tax, the department says, no one can challenge it in court before paying it and seeking a refund.

Jack M. Balkin, a professor at Yale Law School who supports the new law, said, “The tax argument is the strongest argument for upholding” the individual-coverage requirement.

Mr. Obama “has not been honest with the American people about the nature of this bill,” Mr. Balkin said last month at a meeting of the American Constitution Society, a progressive legal organization. “This bill is a tax. Because it’s a tax, it’s completely constitutional.”

Mr. Balkin and other law professors pressed that argument in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in one of the pending cases.

Opponents contend that the “minimum coverage provision” is unconstitutional because it exceeds Congress’s power to regulate commerce.

“This is the first time that Congress has ever ordered Americans to use their own money to purchase a particular good or service,” said Senator Orrin G. Hatch, Republican of Utah.

In their lawsuit, Florida and other states say: “Congress is attempting to regulate and penalize Americans for choosing not to engage in economic activity. If Congress can do this much, there will be virtually no sphere of private decision-making beyond the reach of federal power.”

In reply, the administration and its allies say that a person who goes without insurance is simply choosing to pay for health care out of pocket at a later date. In the aggregate, they say, these decisions have a substantial effect on the interstate market for health care and health insurance.

In its legal briefs, the Obama administration points to a famous New Deal case, Wickard v. Filburn, in which the Supreme Court upheld a penalty imposed on an Ohio farmer who had grown a small amount of wheat, in excess of his production quota, purely for his own use.

The wheat grown by Roscoe Filburn “may be trivial by itself,” the court said, but when combined with the output of other small farmers, it significantly affected interstate commerce and could therefore be regulated by the government as part of a broad scheme regulating interstate commerce.

Sources-
http://www.sideeffectsofxarelto.org/current-xarelto-lawsuits/

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Six Months to Go Until The Largest Tax Hikes in History

From Ryan Ellis

In just six months, the largest tax hikes in the history of America will take effect.  They will hit families and small businesses in three great waves on January 1, 2011:

First Wave: Expiration of 2001 and 2003 Tax Relief

In 2001 and 2003, the GOP Congress enacted several tax cuts for investors, small business owners, and families.  These will all expire on January 1, 2011:

Personal income tax rates will rise. The top income tax rate will rise from 35 to 39.6 percent (this is also the rate at which two-thirds of small business profits are taxed).  The lowest rate will rise from 10 to 15 percent.  All the rates in between will also rise.  Itemized deductions and personal exemptions will again phase out, which has the same mathematical effect as higher marginal tax rates.  The full list of marginal rate hikes is below:

– The 10% bracket rises to an expanded 15%
– The 25% bracket rises to 28%
– The 28% bracket rises to 31%
– The 33% bracket rises to 36%
– The 35% bracket rises to 39.6%

Higher taxes on marriage and family. The “marriage penalty” (narrower tax brackets for married couples) will return from the first dollar of income.  The child tax credit will be cut in half from $1000 to $500 per child.  The standard deduction will no longer be doubled for married couples relative to the single level.  The dependent care and adoption tax credits will be cut.

The return of the Death Tax. This year, there is no death tax.  For those dying on or after January 1 2011, there is a 55 percent top death tax rate on estates over $1 million.  A person leaving behind two homes and a retirement account could easily pass along a death tax bill to their loved ones.

Higher tax rates on savers and investors. The capital gains tax will rise from 15 percent this year to 20 percent in 2011.  The dividends tax will rise from 15 percent this year to 39.6 percent in 2011.  These rates will rise another 3.8 percent in 2013.

Second Wave: Obamacare

There are over twenty new or higher taxes in Obamacare.  Several will first go into effect on January 1, 2011.  They include:

The “Medicine Cabinet Tax” Thanks to Obamacare, Americans will no longer be able to use health savings account (HSA), flexible spending account (FSA), or health reimbursement (HRA) pre-tax dollars to purchase non-prescription, over-the-counter medicines (except insulin).

The “Special Needs Kids Tax” This provision of Obamacare imposes a cap on flexible spending accounts (FSAs) of $2500 (Currently, there is no federal government limit).  There is one group of FSA owners for whom this new cap will be particularly cruel and onerous: parents of special needs children.  There are thousands of families with special needs children in the United States, and many of them use FSAs to pay for special needs education.  Tuition rates at one leading school that teaches special needs children in Washington, D.C. (National Child Research Center) can easily exceed $14,000 per year.  Under tax rules, FSA dollars can be used to pay for this type of special needs education.

The HSA Withdrawal Tax Hike. This provision of Obamacare increases the additional tax on non-medical early withdrawals from an HSA from 10 to 20 percent, disadvantaging them relative to IRAs and other tax-advantaged accounts, which remain at 10 percent.

Third Wave: The Alternative Minimum Tax and Employer Tax Hikes

When Americans prepare to file their tax returns in January of 2011, they’ll be in for a nasty surprise—the AMT won’t be held harmless, and many tax relief provisions will have expired.  The major items include:

The AMT will ensnare over 28 million families, up from 4 million last year. According to the left-leaning Tax Policy Center, Congress’ failure to index the AMT will lead to an explosion of AMT taxpaying families—rising from 4 million last year to 28.5 million.  These families will have to calculate their tax burdens twice, and pay taxes at the higher level.  The AMT was created in 1969 to ensnare a handful of taxpayers.

Small business expensing will be slashed and 50% expensing will disappear. Small businesses can normally expense (rather than slowly-deduct, or “depreciate”) equipment purchases up to $250,000.  This will be cut all the way down to $25,000.  Larger businesses can expense half of their purchases of equipment.  In January of 2011, all of it will have to be “depreciated.”

Taxes will be raised on all types of businesses. There are literally scores of tax hikes on business that will take place.  The biggest is the loss of the “research and experimentation tax credit,” but there are many, many others.  Combining high marginal tax rates with the loss of this tax relief will cost jobs.

Tax Benefits for Education and Teaching Reduced. The deduction for tuition and fees will not be available.  Tax credits for education will be limited.  Teachers will no longer be able to deduct classroom expenses.  Coverdell Education Savings Accounts will be cut.  Employer-provided educational assistance is curtailed.  The student loan interest deduction will be disallowed for hundreds of thousands of families.

Charitable Contributions from IRAs no longer allowed. Under current law, a retired person with an IRA can contribute up to $100,000 per year directly to a charity from their IRA.  This contribution also counts toward an annual “required minimum distribution.”  This ability will no longer be there.

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