Small Firms Start to Drop Health Plans

In 2015, if you work for a small company with less than 50 employees, be prepared to obtain your own individual health insurance.  Small companies are starting to turn away from offering health plans as they seek to reduce costs and increasingly view that individual coverage is an inviting and affordable option for workers.

The health law doesn’t penalize companies with fewer than 50 workers that don’t offer coverage, and those with fewer than 100 employees won’t face fines until 2016.

  •  Anthem Blue Cross recently stated that its small-business-plan membership is shrinking faster than expected. It has lost about 300,000 people since the start of the year, leaving a total of 1.56 million in small-group coverage.
  • Anthem said it had projected that it would take about five-years to significantly reduce small-employer membership, but it now thinks the drop-off will be compressed into two years.
  • Some other insurers have seen a similar trend. Aetna said the company was seeing erosion at the bottom of the market among employers with two to 10 workers. Kaiser Permanente said that it is seeing some contraction in the small-group market, particularly in places where insurers are offering cheap individual plans.
  •  A number of small California companies with less than 50 full-time employees have discontinued their health plans during 2014. This trend will continue next year as companies direct their workers to individual plans issued either through Covered California or directly by an insurance company.  
  • Insurers, for their part, are moving to recapture the lost business by signing up employees to their individual plans. As an example, one carrier said it is seeing the strongest shift away from offering health benefits among the smallest employers with just two to four workers, and is working to ease the transition for companies that want to move from a group plan to individual coverage.

Workers with pre-existing health conditions can now buy coverage on their own, and insurers can’t charge them more based on their health history, as they could before the law took effect.

  •  For many small companies, the increasing paperwork to administer small group plans has become a burden. In addition, the increase in premiums has forced companies to either require an employee pay for a greater percentage of coverage or drop the group coverage altogether.
  •  Many employers are changing how much they will contribute to the premium for employee coverage. A number of companies have begun paying a larger percentage of the employee’s portion but are requiring the employee to pay up to 100% of dependent’s coverage.

Some employers are facing premium increases to keep offering coverage as they shift to plans that meet the law’s requirements—though this impact has been delayed for many because the Obama administration has allowed states and insurers to keep older plans in effect.

*Data obtained from the WSJ online, and other online sources.

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